America's Great Outdoors
"Share the road" takes on a whole new meaning in Yellowstone National Park. More on spring biking in the park at http://go.nps.gov/1x6y2m.Photo: National Park Service

"Share the road" takes on a whole new meaning in Yellowstone National Park. More on spring biking in the park at http://go.nps.gov/1x6y2m.

Photo: National Park Service

Who knew the Bison in Wind Cave National Park were nearsighted?Photo: National Park Service

Who knew the Bison in Wind Cave National Park were nearsighted?

Photo: National Park Service

Snow brings a special quiet to Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge.Photo credit: Cindy Souders / USFWS

Snow brings a special quiet to Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge.

Photo credit: Cindy Souders / USFWS

The Bison photo from yesterday was a big hit, so here’s another one to start your weekend. Here’s a ”traffic jam” in Yellowstone National Park.Photo: National Park Service

The Bison photo from yesterday was a big hit, so here’s another one to start your weekend. Here’s a ”traffic jam” in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

When temperatures Yellowstone National Park dropped below freezing last week, this bison woke up with a frost blanket. The bison’s heavy fur is perfectly adapted to winter conditions. Photo: Tim Townsend

When temperatures Yellowstone National Park dropped below freezing last week, this bison woke up with a frost blanket. The bison’s heavy fur is perfectly adapted to winter conditions.

Photo: Tim Townsend

Rush hour traffic takes on a whole new meaning at Yellowstone National Park.Photo: National Park Service

Rush hour traffic takes on a whole new meaning at Yellowstone National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

Bison frequent the area around Dragon’s Mouth Spring in Yellowstone to feed where it is too warm for the snow to accumulate.Photo: National Park Service

Bison frequent the area around Dragon’s Mouth Spring in Yellowstone to feed where it is too warm for the snow to accumulate.

Photo: National Park Service

How do bison survive the snowy Jackson Hole winters? Well, having a big head helps! Bison can use their heads as a snowplow in winter, swinging it from side to side to sweep aside the snow on the ground. Photo: National Park Service 

How do bison survive the snowy Jackson Hole winters? Well, having a big head helps! Bison can use their heads as a snowplow in winter, swinging it from side to side to sweep aside the snow on the ground. 

Photo: National Park Service 

The National Elk Refuge in Wyoming works to provide, preserve, restore, and manage winter habitat for the nationally significant Jackson Elk Herd and habitat for endangered species, birds, fish, and other big game animals (like these Bison pictured above), and provide compatible human uses associated with the wildlife and wildlands.Photo: USFWS 

The National Elk Refuge in Wyoming works to provide, preserve, restore, and manage winter habitat for the nationally significant Jackson Elk Herd and habitat for endangered species, birds, fish, and other big game animals (like these Bison pictured above), and provide compatible human uses associated with the wildlife and wildlands.

Photo: USFWS 

The National Bison Range in Montana is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It was established in 1908 and is one of the oldest Wildlife Refuges in the nation. As its name implies, the Refuge was established to support a population of American bison. It is home to about 350-500 of these animals. Other large wildlife found on the Range include elk, white-tail and mule deer, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep and black bear. Because of its open grasslands, the Bison Range is a place for the public to enjoy some excellent wildlife observation and photography.Photo: Ryan Hagerty, USFWS 

The National Bison Range in Montana is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It was established in 1908 and is one of the oldest Wildlife Refuges in the nation. As its name implies, the Refuge was established to support a population of American bison. It is home to about 350-500 of these animals. Other large wildlife found on the Range include elk, white-tail and mule deer, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep and black bear. Because of its open grasslands, the Bison Range is a place for the public to enjoy some excellent wildlife observation and photography.

Photo: Ryan Hagerty, USFWS