America's Great Outdoors
Happy 98th birthday to the National Park Service! We’re celebrating this week by highlighting some of the amazing wilderness managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (all bureaus within the Department of the Interior). Each day this week, we will post a photo of wilderness managed by the Department. Which ever photo gets the more shares and likes will be featured next week on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act, which has protected millions of acres of America’s stunning lands.Our first photo comes from the Tuolumne Meadows Wilderness Center within Yosemite National Park.Photo: Sean Goebel (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Happy 98th birthday to the National Park Service! We’re celebrating this week by highlighting some of the amazing wilderness managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (all bureaus within the Department of the Interior). Each day this week, we will post a photo of wilderness managed by the Department. Which ever photo gets the more shares and likes will be featured next week on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act, which has protected millions of acres of America’s stunning lands.

Our first photo comes from the Tuolumne Meadows Wilderness Center within Yosemite National Park.

Photo: Sean Goebel (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Many people enjoyed last night’s Supermoon on America’s public lands. Here is one of our favorites from Joshua National Park!Photo: Brad Sutton

Many people enjoyed last night’s Supermoon on America’s public lands. Here is one of our favorites from Joshua National Park!

Photo: Brad Sutton

This landscape testifies to nature’s size, beauty, and diversity - huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world’s largest trees.Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks lie side-by-side in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of the San Joaquin Valley. Visitor activities vary by season and elevation (1,370 to 14,494 feet).Photo: Cliff LaPlant (www.sharetheexperience.org)

This landscape testifies to nature’s size, beauty, and diversity - huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world’s largest trees.

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks lie side-by-side in the southern Sierra Nevada, east of the San Joaquin Valley. Visitor activities vary by season and elevation (1,370 to 14,494 feet).

Photo: Cliff LaPlant (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry.Photo: Leonel Torres (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry.

Photo: Leonel Torres (www.sharetheexperience.org)

How hot is it in Death Valley National Park? So hot that this coyote pup decided to cool off in this bird bath!Photo: National Park Service

How hot is it in Death Valley National Park? So hot that this coyote pup decided to cool off in this bird bath!

Photo: National Park Service

Happy 150th to Yosemite National Park! Share this photo to wish them a very happy birthday!Photo: Kevin Perez (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Happy 150th to Yosemite National Park! Share this photo to wish them a very happy birthday!

Photo: Kevin Perez (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Happy Pollinators Week! These hard-working animals help pollinate over 75% of our flowering plants, and nearly 75% of our crops. Often we may not notice the hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles, butterflies, and flies that carry pollen from one plant to another as they collect nectar. Yet without them, wildlife would have fewer nutritious berries and seeds, and we would miss many fruits, vegetables, and nuts, like blueberries, squash, and almonds … not to mention chocolate and coffee…all of which depend on pollinators. To learn more, click here.Here’s a cool photo of two hummingbirds doing battle over territory at the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge.Photo: Sarah Chah

Happy Pollinators Week! These hard-working animals help pollinate over 75% of our flowering plants, and nearly 75% of our crops. Often we may not notice the hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles, butterflies, and flies that carry pollen from one plant to another as they collect nectar. Yet without them, wildlife would have fewer nutritious berries and seeds, and we would miss many fruits, vegetables, and nuts, like blueberries, squash, and almonds … not to mention chocolate and coffee…all of which depend on pollinators. To learn more, click here.

Here’s a cool photo of two hummingbirds doing battle over territory at the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge.

Photo: Sarah Chah

Yosemite Falls is past its peak, but still flowing pretty nicely.Photo: National Park Service

Yosemite Falls is past its peak, but still flowing pretty nicely.

Photo: National Park Service

The Golden Gate Bridge opened to vehicles on this date in 1937. Here is an amazing photo of of the bridge taken from the Golden Gate National Recreation Area by Dave Gordon.

The Golden Gate Bridge opened to vehicles on this date in 1937. Here is an amazing photo of of the bridge taken from the Golden Gate National Recreation Area by Dave Gordon.

The California Coastal National Monument comprises more than 20,000 rocks, islands, exposed reefs, and pinnacles along the 1,100 miles of California’s coast.  The scenic beauty and important wildlife habitat within the Monument are protected by the Bureau of Land Management as National Conservation Lands.Millions of people view the California Coastal National Monument from roads, beaches, bluffs, watercraft, or through one of the Monument Gateway Communities.Photo: Bob Wick, BLM

The California Coastal National Monument comprises more than 20,000 rocks, islands, exposed reefs, and pinnacles along the 1,100 miles of California’s coast.  The scenic beauty and important wildlife habitat within the Monument are protected by the Bureau of Land Management as National Conservation Lands.

Millions of people view the California Coastal National Monument from roads, beaches, bluffs, watercraft, or through one of the Monument Gateway Communities.

Photo: Bob Wick, BLM