America's Great Outdoors
Now that is a mouthful! What a great photo of a American white pelican taken at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge.Photo: John Savage/National Wildlife Refuge Association

Now that is a mouthful! What a great photo of a American white pelican taken at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge.

Photo: John Savage/National Wildlife Refuge Association

Evening traffic in Denali National Park. Photo by Daniel A. Leifheit

Evening traffic in Denali National Park.

Photo by Daniel A. Leifheit

Great photo of a bear near Wonder Lake in Denali National Park.Photo: Georgia Riddick

Great photo of a bear near Wonder Lake in Denali National Park.

Photo: Georgia Riddick

How hot is it in Death Valley National Park? So hot that this coyote pup decided to cool off in this bird bath!Photo: National Park Service

How hot is it in Death Valley National Park? So hot that this coyote pup decided to cool off in this bird bath!

Photo: National Park Service

Seen on an early morning patrol in Arches National Park: a cottontail transfixed with fear, a snake still too sluggish to strike, and a chipmunk chirping its fool head off.What happened next, you ask? The bunny hopped away, the patrol ranger escorted the snake safely out of the road, and the chipmunk bored quickly and left. Undramatic, as nature often is — when not scripted for TV.Photo: National Park Service

Seen on an early morning patrol in Arches National Park: a cottontail transfixed with fear, a snake still too sluggish to strike, and a chipmunk chirping its fool head off.

What happened next, you ask? The bunny hopped away, the patrol ranger escorted the snake safely out of the road, and the chipmunk bored quickly and left. Undramatic, as nature often is — when not scripted for TV.

Photo: National Park Service

Photographer Bob Dreeszen took this photo at Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge. We can’t explain what this red fox is doing — but maybe you can by commenting or helping us by sharing this photo with your friends and family!

Photographer Bob Dreeszen took this photo at Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge. We can’t explain what this red fox is doing — but maybe you can by commenting or helping us by sharing this photo with your friends and family!

This is what the morning carpool looks like for a mama opossum in Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge. Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge located 20 miles northwest of Memphis, Tennessee, in Crittenden County, Arkansas was established in 1961 to provided habitat for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Today the refuge literally stands as a wildlife oasis in an agricultural sea. An excellent diversity of habitat exists comprised on mainly agricultural land, bottomland hardwood forest, early stage reforested hardwoods, open water and flooded cypress/willow swamp. Thirty small field impoundments totaling 190 acres have been developed for waterfowl in the agricultural area. Because of its strategic location in the heart of the Mississippi Flyway and the diverse habitat, the refuge is a prime wintering area for migratory waterfowl and a major stopping place for migrating warblers. Bald eagles, great blue herons, great egrets and anhingas nest on the refuge. Photo: Bill Peterson - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

This is what the morning carpool looks like for a mama opossum in Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge.

Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge located 20 miles northwest of Memphis, Tennessee, in Crittenden County, Arkansas was established in 1961 to provided habitat for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Today the refuge literally stands as a wildlife oasis in an agricultural sea. An excellent diversity of habitat exists comprised on mainly agricultural land, bottomland hardwood forest, early stage reforested hardwoods, open water and flooded cypress/willow swamp. Thirty small field impoundments totaling 190 acres have been developed for waterfowl in the agricultural area. Because of its strategic location in the heart of the Mississippi Flyway and the diverse habitat, the refuge is a prime wintering area for migratory waterfowl and a major stopping place for migrating warblers. Bald eagles, great blue herons, great egrets and anhingas nest on the refuge.

Photo: Bill Peterson - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Caribou react to the approach of a grizzly bear near Highway Pass in Denali National Park. NPS Photo/Daniel A. Leifheit

Caribou react to the approach of a grizzly bear near Highway Pass in Denali National Park.

NPS Photo/Daniel A. Leifheit

Padre Island National Seashore separates the Gulf of Mexico from the Laguna Madre, one of a few hypersaline lagoons in the world.  The park protects 70 miles of coastline, dunes, prairies, and wind tidal flats teeming with life.  It is a safe nesting ground for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and a haven for 380 bird species.  It also has a rich history, including the Spanish shipwrecks of 1554.Photo: National Park Service

Padre Island National Seashore separates the Gulf of Mexico from the Laguna Madre, one of a few hypersaline lagoons in the world.  The park protects 70 miles of coastline, dunes, prairies, and wind tidal flats teeming with life.  It is a safe nesting ground for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and a haven for 380 bird species.  It also has a rich history, including the Spanish shipwrecks of 1554.

Photo: National Park Service

Happy Pollinators Week! These hard-working animals help pollinate over 75% of our flowering plants, and nearly 75% of our crops. Often we may not notice the hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles, butterflies, and flies that carry pollen from one plant to another as they collect nectar. Yet without them, wildlife would have fewer nutritious berries and seeds, and we would miss many fruits, vegetables, and nuts, like blueberries, squash, and almonds … not to mention chocolate and coffee…all of which depend on pollinators. To learn more, click here.Here’s a cool photo of two hummingbirds doing battle over territory at the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge.Photo: Sarah Chah

Happy Pollinators Week! These hard-working animals help pollinate over 75% of our flowering plants, and nearly 75% of our crops. Often we may not notice the hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles, butterflies, and flies that carry pollen from one plant to another as they collect nectar. Yet without them, wildlife would have fewer nutritious berries and seeds, and we would miss many fruits, vegetables, and nuts, like blueberries, squash, and almonds … not to mention chocolate and coffee…all of which depend on pollinators. To learn more, click here.

Here’s a cool photo of two hummingbirds doing battle over territory at the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge.

Photo: Sarah Chah