America's Great Outdoors

National Park Service rangers do amazing things every day, so we wanted to bring you all this heartwarming story as a great example of the work they do on a daily basis. Earlier this week, Kenai Fjords National Park staff received a report of a dog stranded on a cliff ledge near the edge of Exit Glacier. After gaining the dog’s trust, the dog was pulled to safety and carried out to the trailhead. Reports are that the dog is recovering well.

Photographer Bob Dreeszen took this photo at Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge. We can’t explain what this red fox is doing — but maybe you can by commenting or helping us by sharing this photo with your friends and family!

Photographer Bob Dreeszen took this photo at Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge. We can’t explain what this red fox is doing — but maybe you can by commenting or helping us by sharing this photo with your friends and family!

Padre Island National Seashore separates the Gulf of Mexico from the Laguna Madre, one of a few hypersaline lagoons in the world.  The park protects 70 miles of coastline, dunes, prairies, and wind tidal flats teeming with life.  It is a safe nesting ground for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and a haven for 380 bird species.  It also has a rich history, including the Spanish shipwrecks of 1554.Photo: National Park Service

Padre Island National Seashore separates the Gulf of Mexico from the Laguna Madre, one of a few hypersaline lagoons in the world.  The park protects 70 miles of coastline, dunes, prairies, and wind tidal flats teeming with life.  It is a safe nesting ground for the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and a haven for 380 bird species.  It also has a rich history, including the Spanish shipwrecks of 1554.

Photo: National Park Service

There have been many reports of bear sightings in Great Smoky Mountains National Park recently. If you see a bear, please remember that for your safety, and the bear’s safety, you need to stay at least 150 feet away from the animal. For more information about what to do if you see a bear, check out http://www.nps.gov/grsm/naturescience/black-bears.htm, where you can find links to a video about bear safety.
This photo by Sam Hobbs taken with a telephoto lens and cropped to make the cub appear closer.

There have been many reports of bear sightings in Great Smoky Mountains National Park recently. If you see a bear, please remember that for your safety, and the bear’s safety, you need to stay at least 150 feet away from the animal. For more information about what to do if you see a bear, check out http://www.nps.gov/grsm/naturescience/black-bears.htm, where you can find links to a video about bear safety.

This photo by Sam Hobbs taken with a telephoto lens and cropped to make the cub appear closer.

Happy World Turtle Day! Meet the bog turtle. It is one of the smallest, rarest turtles in North America. Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Pennsylvania was established in part to protect the federally threatened bog turtle, which can be found in wetlands throughout the valley. Due to their listed status, refuge public use areas are located away from sensitive bog turtle habitats. See what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is doing to protect this little one and its bog wetland habitat: http://1.usa.gov/1o6jyRlPhoto: usfws

Happy World Turtle Day! Meet the bog turtle. It is one of the smallest, rarest turtles in North America. Cherry Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Pennsylvania was established in part to protect the federally threatened bog turtle, which can be found in wetlands throughout the valley. Due to their listed status, refuge public use areas are located away from sensitive bog turtle habitats. 

See what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is doing to protect this little one and its bog wetland habitat: http://1.usa.gov/1o6jyRl

Photo: usfws

Happy Mother’s Day everyone! We hope you all have as much fun today with your moms as this bison calf is having in Yellowstone National Park.Photo: Linda Dodge (www.sharetheexperience.org).

Happy Mother’s Day everyone! We hope you all have as much fun today with your moms as this bison calf is having in Yellowstone National Park.

Photo: Linda Dodge (www.sharetheexperience.org).

These are Belding’s ground squirrels – sometimes called pot gut. They live on mountains in western United States. This pair was photographed by Jim Leonard at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. So, what do you think they are saying?

These are Belding’s ground squirrels – sometimes called pot gut. They live on mountains in western United States. This pair was photographed by Jim Leonard at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. So, what do you think they are saying?

This wildlife camera in Zion National Park gives a whole new meaning to the term “selfie.”Photo: National Park Service

This wildlife camera in Zion National Park gives a whole new meaning to the term “selfie.”

Photo: National Park Service

Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!

Last week we asked you to send us photos and videos of your engagements or weddings on America’s public lands and we have been blown away by your responses! Unfortunately we could not include every submission that we received, but we think you will love what we put together.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that the Buffalo Zoo, in Buffalo, New York is the planned destination, for the near future, for an orphaned polar bear cub found near Point Lay, Alaska, on March 12. The three-to-four month-old male, named Kali (pronounced cully - the Inupiat name for Point Lay), is currently receiving care at the Alaska Zoo but is expected to be safely transported to the Buffalo Zoo sometime this spring, pending final approvals and the health of the cub.Kali will be introduced to the Buffalo Zoo’s female polar bear cub, born on November 27, 2012. She is being hand-raised by the Zoo’s veterinary and keeper staff due to inadequate care by the cub’s mother, Anana. The orphaned cub’s planned journey from Point Lay to Buffalo is the product of collaboration among the Alaska Zoo, the Buffalo Zoo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and the AZA’s Polar Bear Species Survival Plan® management group.
To read more, click here: 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced that the Buffalo Zoo, in Buffalo, New York is the planned destination, for the near future, for an orphaned polar bear cub found near Point Lay, Alaska, on March 12. The three-to-four month-old male, named Kali (pronounced cully - the Inupiat name for Point Lay), is currently receiving care at the Alaska Zoo but is expected to be safely transported to the Buffalo Zoo sometime this spring, pending final approvals and the health of the cub.

Kali will be introduced to the Buffalo Zoo’s female polar bear cub, born on November 27, 2012. She is being hand-raised by the Zoo’s veterinary and keeper staff due to inadequate care by the cub’s mother, Anana. The orphaned cub’s planned journey from Point Lay to Buffalo is the product of collaboration among the Alaska Zoo, the Buffalo Zoo, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) and the AZA’s Polar Bear Species Survival Plan® management group.

To read more, click here