America's Great Outdoors
St. Mary Lake — St. Mary Lake sits within the St. Mary Valley—”the eastern gateway to Glacier National Park. Prairies, mountains, and forests all converge in the valley to create a diverse and rich habitat for plants and animals. The open meadows surrounded by dense forests can afford some great opportunities for wildlife viewing.” Photo: Kim Keating, USGS

St. Mary Lake — St. Mary Lake sits within the St. Mary Valley—”the eastern gateway to Glacier National Park. Prairies, mountains, and forests all converge in the valley to create a diverse and rich habitat for plants and animals. The open meadows surrounded by dense forests can afford some great opportunities for wildlife viewing.” 

Photo: Kim Keating, USGS

Two Medicine Lake, East Glacier in Glacier National Park.

Two Medicine Lake, East Glacier in Glacier National Park.

A moose looks for aquatic plants in Wonder Lake in Denali National Park. NPS Photo/K. Lewandowski

A moose looks for aquatic plants in Wonder Lake in Denali National Park.

NPS Photo/K. Lewandowski

Bear Lake, just after sunset, with Hallett Peak in the background, just beginning to be enveloped by clouds in Rocky Mountain National Park.Photo: Glenn Nelson (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Bear Lake, just after sunset, with Hallett Peak in the background, just beginning to be enveloped by clouds in Rocky Mountain National Park.

Photo: Glenn Nelson (www.sharetheexperience.org)

This week, Glacier National Park turns 104. Please join us in wishing them a very happy birthday!Photo: Adam Jewell (www.sharetheexperience.org)

This week, Glacier National Park turns 104. Please join us in wishing them a very happy birthday!

Photo: Adam Jewell (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Michael DeWitt took this stunning photo from Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin. Here’s what he had to say about it. "In late December, a friend and I launched a canoe from the pack ice at Meyer’s Beach, gateway to the mainland sea caves in the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. We broke skim ice and dodged ice bergs out to the caves, and we were well rewarded for our efforts. I made the image from the canoe, through a port hole as the sun set across Mawikwe Bay."

Michael DeWitt took this stunning photo from Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin. Here’s what he had to say about it.

"In late December, a friend and I launched a canoe from the pack ice at Meyer’s Beach, gateway to the mainland sea caves in the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. We broke skim ice and dodged ice bergs out to the caves, and we were well rewarded for our efforts. I made the image from the canoe, through a port hole as the sun set across Mawikwe Bay."

No place else on earth combines a deep, pure lake, so blue in color; sheer surrounding cliffs, almost two thousand feet high; two picturesque islands; and a violent volcanic past like Crater Lake National Park.Photo: National Park Service

No place else on earth combines a deep, pure lake, so blue in color; sheer surrounding cliffs, almost two thousand feet high; two picturesque islands; and a violent volcanic past like Crater Lake National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

President Obama signed S.23 into law yesterday, legislation designating 32,557 acres of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Michigan as wilderness, the first congressional designation under the Wilderness Act since 2009. The Wilderness Act, signed into law in 1964, established the highest level of conservation protection for federal lands. It prohibits permanent roads and commercial enterprises, except commercial services that may provide for recreational or other purposes of the Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas generally do not allow motorized equipment, motor vehicles, mechanical transport, temporary roads, permanent structures or installation. Visitors can engage in non-motorized recreation in wilderness areas, including hiking, fishing, camping, and hunting.To learn more, click here: http://bitly.com/1nWeiwvPhoto: Debbie Maglothin (www.sharetheexperience.org)

President Obama signed S.23 into law yesterday, legislation designating 32,557 acres of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Michigan as wilderness, the first congressional designation under the Wilderness Act since 2009. 

The Wilderness Act, signed into law in 1964, established the highest level of conservation protection for federal lands. It prohibits permanent roads and commercial enterprises, except commercial services that may provide for recreational or other purposes of the Wilderness Act. Wilderness areas generally do not allow motorized equipment, motor vehicles, mechanical transport, temporary roads, permanent structures or installation. Visitors can engage in non-motorized recreation in wilderness areas, including hiking, fishing, camping, and hunting.

To learn more, click here: http://bitly.com/1nWeiwv

Photo: Debbie Maglothin (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Wild ice views of Telaquana Lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve from an overflight this past Monday. Photo: National Park Service

Wild ice views of Telaquana Lake in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve from an overflight this past Monday. 

Photo: National Park Service

For the first time in five years, the ice on Lake Superior is thick enough to visit the spectacular sea caves of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin. Inside the caves awaits a fairyland of needlelike icicles. The formations change from chamber to chamber and from day to day. Apostle Islands is experiencing high volume of visitors right now, so we recommend that you visit the caves during the week. Before heading to the caves, please call the Ice Line at (715) 779-3397 - extension 3, for the most current ice condition information. Photo: National Park Service

For the first time in five years, the ice on Lake Superior is thick enough to visit the spectacular sea caves of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin. Inside the caves awaits a fairyland of needlelike icicles. The formations change from chamber to chamber and from day to day. Apostle Islands is experiencing high volume of visitors right now, so we recommend that you visit the caves during the week. Before heading to the caves, please call the Ice Line at (715) 779-3397 - extension 3, for the most current ice condition information.

Photo: National Park Service