America's Great Outdoors
Skyline Rim near Factory Butte provides incredible, expansive views of the deserts of eastern Utah. The Henry Mountains offer a stout backdrop.Photo: Brandon Jolley, BLM Rangeland Management Specialist

Skyline Rim near Factory Butte provides incredible, expansive views of the deserts of eastern Utah. The Henry Mountains offer a stout backdrop.

Photo: Brandon Jolley, BLM Rangeland Management Specialist

Photographer Rich Keen captured a tender moment between a bison & calf at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Refuge.Located just northeast of Denver, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge is a 15,000-acre expanse of prairie, wetland and woodland habitat. The land has a unique story - it has survived the test of time and transitioned from farmland, to war-time manufacturing site, to wildlife sanctuary. It may be one of the finest conservation success stories in history and a place where wildlife thrives. 

Photographer Rich Keen captured a tender moment between a bison & calf at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Refuge.

Located just northeast of Denver, the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge is a 15,000-acre expanse of prairie, wetland and woodland habitat. The land has a unique story - it has survived the test of time and transitioned from farmland, to war-time manufacturing site, to wildlife sanctuary. It may be one of the finest conservation success stories in history and a place where wildlife thrives. 

Uncle Tom’s Trail in Yellowstone National Park: a great place to catch your breath.Photo: National Park Service

Uncle Tom’s Trail in Yellowstone National Park: a great place to catch your breath.

Photo: National Park Service

Photo from the west side of May Lake in Yosemite National Park.Photo: National Park Service

Photo from the west side of May Lake in Yosemite National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

St. Mary Falls in Glacier National Park.Photo: National Park Service

St. Mary Falls in Glacier National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

Frogs love a rainy day to explore new ponds. Many small young frogs have been seen lately on Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge in Minnesota. Here’s a unique find on the refuge - an albino wood frog.This 43,000 acre National Wildlife Refuge includes over 20 lakes, three rivers and hundreds of marshes and woodland ponds. The Refuge is host to over 250 birds, including nesting bald eagles, scarlet tanagers, golden-wing warblers, and ruffed grouse. Tamarac is a premier site for a growing trumpeter swan population. Visitors can search for white-tail deer, porcupine, beaver, river otter, black bear, or the elusive gray wolf along the scenic auto tour route. Observation platforms with spotting scopes enhance your viewing opportunities. An attractive visitor center offers a spectacular vista of the marshes and trees that are typical of Tamarac Refuge. A theater presentation provides orientation to the life and legends of this unique area. Your purchase at the small gift shop of wildlife books and locally made crafts serves as a fund-raiser of the Friends of Tamarac for educational programs and habitat enhancements. Enjoy hiking trails, historic sites, hunting and fishing. The Visitor Center is open weekdays year round 8am-4pm as well as summer and fall weekends 10am-5pm.Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Frogs love a rainy day to explore new ponds. Many small young frogs have been seen lately on Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge in Minnesota. Here’s a unique find on the refuge - an albino wood frog.

This 43,000 acre National Wildlife Refuge includes over 20 lakes, three rivers and hundreds of marshes and woodland ponds. The Refuge is host to over 250 birds, including nesting bald eagles, scarlet tanagers, golden-wing warblers, and ruffed grouse. Tamarac is a premier site for a growing trumpeter swan population. Visitors can search for white-tail deer, porcupine, beaver, river otter, black bear, or the elusive gray wolf along the scenic auto tour route. Observation platforms with spotting scopes enhance your viewing opportunities. An attractive visitor center offers a spectacular vista of the marshes and trees that are typical of Tamarac Refuge. A theater presentation provides orientation to the life and legends of this unique area. Your purchase at the small gift shop of wildlife books and locally made crafts serves as a fund-raiser of the Friends of Tamarac for educational programs and habitat enhancements. Enjoy hiking trails, historic sites, hunting and fishing. The Visitor Center is open weekdays year round 8am-4pm as well as summer and fall weekends 10am-5pm.

Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Moose in the mist.There was a heavy fog in the river valley this morning in Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. This large bull moose was spotted eating his breakfast of Pacific willow leaves and branches near Headquarters. Photo: Tom Koerner/USFWS

Moose in the mist.

There was a heavy fog in the river valley this morning in Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. This large bull moose was spotted eating his breakfast of Pacific willow leaves and branches near Headquarters.

Photo: Tom Koerner/USFWS

From all of us at the Department of the Interior and NPS (including this grizzly bear), we want to thank you for the kind words about the National Park Service 98th birthday today. Here is a another photo celebrating the national parks and the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Wilderness act on September 3rd.This bear is in Lake Clark National Park, a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home. Solitude is found around every bend in the river and shoulder of a mountain. Venture into the park to become part of the wilderness. Photo: Kevin Dietrich (www.sharetheexperience.org)

From all of us at the Department of the Interior and NPS (including this grizzly bear), we want to thank you for the kind words about the National Park Service 98th birthday today. Here is a another photo celebrating the national parks and the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Wilderness act on September 3rd.

This bear is in Lake Clark National Park, a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home. Solitude is found around every bend in the river and shoulder of a mountain. Venture into the park to become part of the wilderness. 

Photo: Kevin Dietrich (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Happy 98th birthday to the National Park Service! We’re celebrating this week by highlighting some of the amazing wilderness managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (all bureaus within the Department of the Interior). Each day this week, we will post a photo of wilderness managed by the Department. Which ever photo gets the more shares and likes will be featured next week on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act, which has protected millions of acres of America’s stunning lands.Our first photo comes from the Tuolumne Meadows Wilderness Center within Yosemite National Park.Photo: Sean Goebel (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Happy 98th birthday to the National Park Service! We’re celebrating this week by highlighting some of the amazing wilderness managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (all bureaus within the Department of the Interior). Each day this week, we will post a photo of wilderness managed by the Department. Which ever photo gets the more shares and likes will be featured next week on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act, which has protected millions of acres of America’s stunning lands.

Our first photo comes from the Tuolumne Meadows Wilderness Center within Yosemite National Park.

Photo: Sean Goebel (www.sharetheexperience.org)

The sea otter version of a pedicure in Glacier Bay National Park.Photo: National Park Service

The sea otter version of a pedicure in Glacier Bay National Park.

Photo: National Park Service