America's Great Outdoors
Happy 98th birthday to the National Park Service! We’re celebrating this week by highlighting some of the amazing wilderness managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (all bureaus within the Department of the Interior). Each day this week, we will post a photo of wilderness managed by the Department. Which ever photo gets the more shares and likes will be featured next week on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act, which has protected millions of acres of America’s stunning lands.Our first photo comes from the Tuolumne Meadows Wilderness Center within Yosemite National Park.Photo: Sean Goebel (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Happy 98th birthday to the National Park Service! We’re celebrating this week by highlighting some of the amazing wilderness managed by the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (all bureaus within the Department of the Interior). Each day this week, we will post a photo of wilderness managed by the Department. Which ever photo gets the more shares and likes will be featured next week on the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Wilderness Act, which has protected millions of acres of America’s stunning lands.

Our first photo comes from the Tuolumne Meadows Wilderness Center within Yosemite National Park.

Photo: Sean Goebel (www.sharetheexperience.org)

There is some excellent stargazing to be had in the Pole Creek Wilderness, Idaho.Photo: Bob Wick

There is some excellent stargazing to be had in the Pole Creek Wilderness, Idaho.

Photo: Bob Wick

The rugged beauty of the Badlands draws visitors from around the world. These striking geologic deposits contain one of the world’s richest fossil beds. Ancient mammals such as the rhino, horse, and saber-toothed cat once roamed here. The park’s 244,000 acres protect an expanse of mixed-grass prairie where bison, bighorn sheep, prairie dogs, and black-footed ferrets live today.Photo: Kevin Palmer (www.sharetheexperience.org)

The rugged beauty of the Badlands draws visitors from around the world. These striking geologic deposits contain one of the world’s richest fossil beds. Ancient mammals such as the rhino, horse, and saber-toothed cat once roamed here. The park’s 244,000 acres protect an expanse of mixed-grass prairie where bison, bighorn sheep, prairie dogs, and black-footed ferrets live today.

Photo: Kevin Palmer (www.sharetheexperience.org)

The last light of the day melts into the Flathead River in Glacier National Park.Photo: National Park Service

The last light of the day melts into the Flathead River in Glacier National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

The scenic quality of the Handies Peak Wilderness Study Area in Colorado is outstanding due to the interaction of mountainous landforms; multi-colored rock strata; diverse vegetation; and vast, open vistas. Handies Peak itself rises 14048 feet over the area and is the highest point of land managed by the Bureau of Land Management outside of Alaska. This WSA also hosts 12 other peaks that rise over 13,000 feet, three major canyons, numerous small drainages, glacial cirques and three alpine lakes. The geomorphology shows a variety of volcanic, glacial and Precambrian formations. A rock glacier formation is also located at the head of American Basin.Vegetation consists mainly of mixed sprice, fir, aspen, alpine grasses, sedges, and forbs. Fauna includes elk, deer, black bear, various small mammals, bighorn sheep, and very rarely, mountain goats.Recreation activities include hiking, backpacking, camping, mountain climbing, and photography. Please note that though unconfined recreation is encouraged in WSAs, specific types of recreation may be barred from a specific area to prevent degradation of natural conditions.Plan your trip: http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/BLM_Programs/national_landscape/wilderness_study_areas/handies_peak.htmlPhoto: Bob Wick, BLM California — at Bureau of Land Management - Colorado.

The scenic quality of the Handies Peak Wilderness Study Area in Colorado is outstanding due to the interaction of mountainous landforms; multi-colored rock strata; diverse vegetation; and vast, open vistas. Handies Peak itself rises 14048 feet over the area and is the highest point of land managed by the Bureau of Land Management outside of Alaska. This WSA also hosts 12 other peaks that rise over 13,000 feet, three major canyons, numerous small drainages, glacial cirques and three alpine lakes. The geomorphology shows a variety of volcanic, glacial and Precambrian formations. A rock glacier formation is also located at the head of American Basin.

Vegetation consists mainly of mixed sprice, fir, aspen, alpine grasses, sedges, and forbs. Fauna includes elk, deer, black bear, various small mammals, bighorn sheep, and very rarely, mountain goats.

Recreation activities include hiking, backpacking, camping, mountain climbing, and photography. Please note that though unconfined recreation is encouraged in WSAs, specific types of recreation may be barred from a specific area to prevent degradation of natural conditions.

Plan your trip: http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/BLM_Programs/national_landscape/wilderness_study_areas/handies_peak.html

Photo: Bob Wick, BLM California — at Bureau of Land Management - Colorado.

Early morning take off over Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico. Established in 1939 to provide a critical stopover for migrating waterfowl, the refuge is well known for the thousands of sandhill cranes, geese and other waterfowl that winter here each year. Photo: Kim Hang Dessoliers (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Early morning take off over Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico. Established in 1939 to provide a critical stopover for migrating waterfowl, the refuge is well known for the thousands of sandhill cranes, geese and other waterfowl that winter here each year. 

Photo: Kim Hang Dessoliers (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry.Photo: Leonel Torres (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot high Rainbow Falls, and pristine mountain scenery. The formation is a rare sight in the geologic world and ranks as one of the world’s finest examples of columnar basalt. Its columns tower 60 feet high and display an unusual symmetry.

Photo: Leonel Torres (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Gorgeous sunrise over Great Smoky Mountains National Park.Photo: Chris Mobley (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Gorgeous sunrise over Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Photo: Chris Mobley (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Evening traffic in Denali National Park. Photo by Daniel A. Leifheit

Evening traffic in Denali National Park.

Photo by Daniel A. Leifheit

How about a “wow” photo to start the day. Max Seigal took this great nighttime photo of The Wave in Paria Canyon-Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness in Arizona.

How about a “wow” photo to start the day. Max Seigal took this great nighttime photo of The Wave in Paria Canyon-Vermillion Cliffs Wilderness in Arizona.