America's Great Outdoors
Here’s your daily dose of cute: A Hawaiian monk seal yearling takes care of an itch. Photographer Mark Sullivan captured this moment at the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge.

Photo courtesy of the National Wildlife Refuge Association.

Here’s your daily dose of cute: A Hawaiian monk seal yearling takes care of an itch. Photographer Mark Sullivan captured this moment at the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge.

Photo courtesy of the National Wildlife Refuge Association.

You never know what you’ll find in our National Wildlife Refuges. Here, a swamp gator “plays” with a turtle in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. But don’t worry, the gator gave up and the turtle walked away.This photo by Patrick Castleberry is another amazing photo submitted to the National Wildlife Refuge Association photo contest. To see more, click here. 

You never know what you’ll find in our National Wildlife Refuges. Here, a swamp gator “plays” with a turtle in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. But don’t worry, the gator gave up and the turtle walked away.

This photo by Patrick Castleberry is another amazing photo submitted to the National Wildlife Refuge Association photo contest. To see more, click here

The Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Refuge is located along the central coast of California, in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west and farmland to the east, the refuge encompasses one of the largest coastal dune systems remaining in California.The refuge was established to protect breeding habitat for the endangered California least tern and the threatened western snowy plover. The refuge also provides habitat for other endangered species, including the California tiger salamander (recently listed for protection under the Endangered Species Act), California red-legged frog, Morro blue butterfly, shoulder band dune snail, and 16 rare or endangered plant species.Photo: USFWS/Shive 

The Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Refuge is located along the central coast of California, in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west and farmland to the east, the refuge encompasses one of the largest coastal dune systems remaining in California.

The refuge was established to protect breeding habitat for the endangered California least tern and the threatened western snowy plover. The refuge also provides habitat for other endangered species, including the California tiger salamander (recently listed for protection under the Endangered Species Act), California red-legged frog, Morro blue butterfly, shoulder band dune snail, and 16 rare or endangered plant species.

Photo: USFWS/Shive 

The Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge contains 7,000 acres of wildlife habitat for migratory birds, nesting sea turtles and the endangered Alabama beach mouse. The refuge was established by Congress in 1980 to preserve the coastal dune ecosystem, to protect threatened and endangered species, to provide compatible recreational opportunities, and to serve as a living laboratory for students and scientists.Photo: USFWS 

The Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge contains 7,000 acres of wildlife habitat for migratory birds, nesting sea turtles and the endangered Alabama beach mouse. The refuge was established by Congress in 1980 to preserve the coastal dune ecosystem, to protect threatened and endangered species, to provide compatible recreational opportunities, and to serve as a living laboratory for students and scientists.

Photo: USFWS 

As part of President Obama’s initiative to fuel the economy and create jobs by promoting travel and tourism, the administration today announced a new design, improved navigation tools and expanded content for Recreation.Gov, the interagency website that guides visitors to 90,000 sites on federal lands such as national parks, wildlife refuges, waterways, forests and recreation areas.

The redesign of www.recreation.gov is an initial step in a multi-year strategy to engage visitors with enhanced interactive content and more multimedia, mobile, trip-planning tools. The seven million visitors who use the web site every year will be able to make reservations, see ready-made itineraries for destination cities, and search for activities on an interactive map.

We put together this short video to show all the amazing places you can visit through www.recreation.gov

Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1965 as mitigation for the loss of habitat when Flaming Gorge and Fontenelle dams were constructed. The riparian corridor is an important migration route and nesting area for a wide variety of migratory waterfowl and passerine bird species.Refuge lands are rich in historic and cultural resources because the area was used by nomadic Indian tribes, fur trappers, and early pioneers. Hundreds of thousands of pioneers crossed the treacherous Green River on what is now Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. The Oregon and Mormon Trails, which crossed the refuge, have been designated as National Historic Trails by Congress. Jim Bridger and others operated ferries on the Green In the 1840’s and 1850’s. Diaries of immigrants often mention the crossing on the river and its difficulties. Ferries were swept away by the strong currents and lives and possessions were lost. To this day, some of the trails can be traced across the Refuge by their ruts.Photo: USFWS 

Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1965 as mitigation for the loss of habitat when Flaming Gorge and Fontenelle dams were constructed. The riparian corridor is an important migration route and nesting area for a wide variety of migratory waterfowl and passerine bird species.

Refuge lands are rich in historic and cultural resources because the area was used by nomadic Indian tribes, fur trappers, and early pioneers. Hundreds of thousands of pioneers crossed the treacherous Green River on what is now Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. The Oregon and Mormon Trails, which crossed the refuge, have been designated as National Historic Trails by Congress. Jim Bridger and others operated ferries on the Green In the 1840’s and 1850’s. Diaries of immigrants often mention the crossing on the river and its difficulties. Ferries were swept away by the strong currents and lives and possessions were lost. To this day, some of the trails can be traced across the Refuge by their ruts.

Photo: USFWS